BluePlanet_SarahDavidson
a dark day for planet earth, ink, watercolour, flashe, pencil crayon, oil pastel, chalk and graphite on paper, 43 x 54 in, 2017.

for the trees
book launch and exhibition
drawings by Sarah Davidson
publication by Erica Wilk / Moniker Press
with writing by Brynn McNab

opening: April 13, 7-10
reading at 8
copies of ‘for the trees’ for purchase
gallery hours: April 14 & 15, 12-5

Dynamo Arts Association
30 east 6th avenue unit 103
Vancouver, BC
dynamoarts.ca

contact: davidsonsar@gmail.com

Preservation is a word oft associated with environmental activism. However, its implementation is a distinctly “cultural” phenomenon, not a natural one. Namely, it is one of human beings, and their technologies. Preservation brings along with it a whole host of other activities. The verb implies an external process to occur in order to accomplish its goal. You have pickling, salting, fermenting, cataloguing, copying, categorizing, languaging, embalming. In reality, ruin itself is a much needed process in the activity of sustainment of diverse life. The transfer of heat from one system (biological, ecological, and, I would argue, visual, and ontological) is integral and the multiplicities of systems allows for a birth of organization in the transfer of this heat. Origin of Species by Darwin, and Kelvin’s laws of thermodynamics were published in the same decade. They both came on the tail end of the industrial revolution. Both theories were argued as paradoxical, and heretical, by the church. Both conceptually resist the possibility of a creative or intelligent design in the world. However, once you consider the closed system of thermodynamics as being one which encompasses you, the earth, the universe, this transfer of heat and its loss in the process – the movement of such energy – can still create a beautiful and complex diversity of ruin.

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for the trees is a collaborative book experiment based on a series of drawings by Sarah Davidson. The publication was developed through conversation with Erica Wilk, who uses her publishing studio Moniker Press as a platform for artistic collaboration. The book includes a text written by Brynn McNab in response to the art. Copies of for the trees will be available for purchase, and the original works will be on display.

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SARAH DAVIDSON’s practice investigates the appeal of the weak, delicate, and otherwise diminutive, by placing it in playful parallel to other ostensibly unrelated ideas. An ongoing interest in the fragment as symbol reflects an interest in medium as gendered and maps as they exist in lived time. Past fragmentary explorations have aligned historical craft—particularly the stitching of quilts—with depictions of landscape as background. sarahdavidson.ca

MONIKER PRESS is a risograph publishing studio located in Vancouver, BC. Owner and operator, Erica Wilk, works collaboratively with artists and writers to produce small editions of books, zines and print ephemera. monikerpress.ca

BRYNN MCNAB is a writer, facilitator, and curator who specializes in event-based and social practices, publishing, and co-authorship. Her most recent projects include Co-Writing Criticism (Vancouver, Montreal and Paris), a co-authorship workshop, and An Exact Vertigo (Vancouver), an iterative contemporary dance series. She managed Unit/Pitt Projects (Vancouver) from 2013-2015, and revived and became editor-in-chief of ISSUE Magazine (Vancouver) during that time. Her poetry, essays, and short stories have been published across Canada and internationally. She attended Nova Scotia College of Art and Design for filmmaking and photography, and holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Emily Carr University in Critical and Cultural Practices. Brynn McNab currently sits as Secretary of the Or Gallery (Vancouver) Board of Directors. brynncatherinemcnab.com

Kiosk, Dynamo Arts Association, and Moniker Press invite you to our Print Fair/Market on December 17th at Dynamo Arts Association (103 – 30 East 6th ave) . This one day event will showcase a variety of print/publishing, with performances and readings from 6pm onwards.

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Participating publishers:
Moniker Press
Andrea Lukic
Kate Fobert
Cole James Pauls
Kirsten Hatfield
Perro Verlag
DDOOGG
As.iZ
Unfastened
Hayley Dawn Muir
Leftover Crafts
Zine Club
Paper Innards Distro
Stephanie McDonell + Phaedra Harder
Neoglyphic Media
Carli Erin Boisjolie
Vancouver Art Book Fair
Black Market

Performances and readings by:
Christian Vistan
CPI Readings * Launch for CPI poetry journal Issue 2 ! *

Poster by William Dereume

Organized by Juli Majer, Erica Wilk, and Sarah Davidson

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IN LINE, TO GLUE is a two person exhibition featuring new collage works by artists Sarah Davidson & Elisabeth Horan at The Bakery.

Opening reception Saturday November 12th, 6-9pm
Exhibition Run November 12th – December 10th, 2016
Gallery hours during exhibition: Saturdays 1-5p

SARAH DAVIDSON’s practice investigates the appeal of the weak, delicate, and otherwise diminutive, by placing it in playful parallel to other ostensibly unrelated ideas. With its delicate construction reflecting a delicately humorous attitude, her current body of work poises at the intersection of art history and embodied experience of space. An ongoing interest in the fragment as symbol reflects an interest in medium as gendered and maps as they exist in lived time. Past fragmentary explorations have aligned historical craft—particularly the stitching of quilts—with depictions of landscape as background. Her more recent work treats the fragment itself as symbol, character and vocabulary.

ELISABETH HORAN‘S current body of work focuses on splicing together found images of clotheslines. Horan appreciates the characteristics of this particular subject matter in that it can simultaneously represent lightness and heaviness. In previous collage works she used ink shadows to suggest a moving source of light (the sun) and chairs to speak directly to the act of sitting, waiting, meditating and reflecting. The clothesline has a relatable and universal visual presence that can trigger distinct memories. A romanticized notion of simpler times. Horan finds something inherently ethereal and dreamy about clotheslines. In her studio practice she searches through magazines for source material. For Horan, printed matter represents a sort of souvenir of our collective subconscious. The combination of this artistic process and the particular imagery chosen brings psychological potency to this body of work.

More on The Bakery’s website, including a conversation between myself and Elisabeth:

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